Symphoria 2018

 
 Symphoria 2018

Novel Drug Delivery System (NDDS) have the potential to revolutionize the pharmaceutical world and are an important tool for expanding drug markets in pharmaceutical industry. NDDS can minimize problems by enhancing efficacy, safety, patient compliance and product shelf life. Nanoparticles are of current interest because of an emerging understanding of their possible effects on human health and environmental sustainability. Advances in protein engineering and materials science have contributed to novel nanoscale targeting approaches. Several therapeutic nanocarriers have been approved for clinical use.

The objective of the seminar is to focus on challenges and future nanotechnology strategies in the pharmacy world by bringing together researchers, industry and academics including students. Continuing improvement in the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of drugs is driving the revolution in Novel Drug Delivery Systems. In fact, a wide spectrum of therapeutic nanocarriers have been extensively investigated to address this emerging need.

One of the most active research areas of nanotechnology is nanomedicine, which applies nanotechnology to highly specific medical interventions for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The surge in nanomedicine research during the past few decades is now translating into considerable commercialization efforts around the globe, with many products on the market and a growing number in the pipeline. Currently, nanomedicine is dominated by drug delivery systems, accounting for more than 75% of total sales. This Symposium will mainly focus on the challenges and opportunities where current and emerging novel drug delivery systems could enable development of novel classes of therapeutics, and strategies to overcome limitations in drug delivery. It will serve to provide a glimpse into this rapidly evolving field, both now and what may be expected in the future.

 


Symphoria_2020
 
 

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